Reconnecting State and Kinship

By Tatjana Thelen; Erdmute Alber | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 3
Inside and Outside the Language of Kinship
Public and Private Conceptions of Sociality

FRANCES PINE


Spaces of Kinship and Politics

This chapter is concerned with spaces of kinship and spaces of politics, and the often very blurred boundary between them, in certain socialist and postsocialist contexts. I am taking politics to mean both formal political structures of the state and its discourses and less formal ways of engaging with the world of power, authority, economy, and resources outside or in opposition to the state. Similarly, I look at kinship in terms of both discursive ideology and practice. Ethnographically, the chapter is based primarily on my own field data from Poland over the past three decades, but it also uses comparative material from other anthropological sources.

The questions I touch on here are concerned with the ways that kinship and politics—the house and the state—as discourses, ideal systems, and sites of practice (making and doing) both weave together and tear apart narratives of belonging, self, and other in the lived world and claims and counterclaims of equality and hierarchy, entitlement and exclusion, power and brutality, and safety and nurture. I have argued elsewhere that very commonly, stories, or narratives, serve as moral acts and practices, which in many instances form a vehicle for transmitting knowledge and understanding about proper relationships and proper ways of behaving and being in the world (Pine 2002, 2007; see also Cruikshank 1998; Gilsenan 1996); they do this, I suggest, by both positive and negative example—showing kinship as a moral framework for relations between citizens (comrades) and the state or

-87-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Reconnecting State and Kinship
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 250

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.