An Asian Frontier: American Anthropology and Korea, 1882-1945

By Robert Oppenheim | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This project has been simmering for a long time, only to have its heat turned up in more recent years. In 2001, while a PhD student in the Department of Anthropology of the University of Chicago, I designed and taught my first undergraduate course under the auspices of a “Starr Lectureship”; two years after, on my way out of Hyde Park, I was deep in the papers of the eponym of that award. What began as a lark—I had picked up Starr’s Korean Buddhism years before and quickly put it back down again as a mere curiosity, probably not the first or last time that has happened—eventually snowballed and, propelled no doubt by my sublimation of tensions of anthropology and area study I had long felt, turned into the present book. Although my Chicago dissertation and first monograph were on a different topic, in developing my historical concerns I remained a beneficiary of the intellectual openness and long leash afforded me by my committee, which was chaired by John D. Kelly and included also John MacAloon, André Schmid, and Joseph Masco. I had not studied closely with George W. Stocking Jr. throughout most of my graduate school career, but despite this and his own low assessment of Starr he was extremely generous in helping me make connections at a memorable meeting in my final months in 2003. Similarly, I had not worked much with Bruce Cumings until my last year, but I have taken his breadth of vision into the modern American-Korean relationship, evident to me on several occasions

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
An Asian Frontier: American Anthropology and Korea, 1882-1945
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 425

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.