An Asian Frontier: American Anthropology and Korea, 1882-1945

By Robert Oppenheim | Go to book overview

NOTES

INTRODUCTION
1. For considerations of this focus, its major constitutive figures, and its theoretical implications, see for instance Hinsley, Savages and Scientists; Stocking, The Ethnographer’s Magic and Other Essays, 114–77; Baker, From Savage to Negro, 26–53; Valentine and Darnell, Theorizing the Americanist Tradition; Darnell, Invisible Genealogies; and Hasinoff, “The Missionary Exhibit,” 82–83.
2. Cole, Traditions of the Tinguian; Barton, “Ifugao Law”; Mead, Coming of Age; Embree, Suye Mura; Benedict, The Chrysanthemum and the Sword; Hsu, Under the Ancestors’ Shadow. See also Yans-McLaughlin, “Science, Democracy, and Ethics.”
3. Robertson, “Introduction,” 4. See also Bennett, “Some Observations on Western Anthropological Research.”
4. Fei Xiaotong, who studied with Malinowski before returning to China, is generally recognized as a milestone in British anthropological interest; see Fei, Peasant Life in China; and Yamashita, Bosco, and Eades, “Asian Anthropologies,” 2. The connections that Fei forged with British scholarship were mediated by the stewardship of Wu Wenzao at Yenjing University, who, after himself studying under Franz Boas at Columbia, brought Radcliffe-Brown to China as a visitor and sent some of his own students to Malinowski’s care. See Guldin, The Saga of Anthropology in China, 65–66; and Liu, “Past and Present,” 158. On British anthropology more generally, see Kuper, Anthropologists and Anthropology; Stocking, “The Ethnographer’s Magic”; Stocking, Victorian Anthropology; and Stocking, After Tylor.
5. Yamashita, Bosco, and Eades, “Asian Anthropologies.” For China, see Freedman, “Sociology in China”; Guldin, The Saga of Anthropology in China;

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