The Trans-Mississippi and International Expositions of 1898-1899: Art, Anthropology, and Popular Culture at the Fin de Siècle

By Wendy Jean Katz | Go to book overview

SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY

This bibliography collects secondary published sources on the two expositions, including theses. The main exclusion was books/ articles cited by the authors in this volume that did not pertain to either the 1898 or 1899 exposition. For relevant government documents, personal papers, and ephemera including pamphlets, see notes to individual chapters.

Alfers, Kenneth G. “Triumph of the West: The Trans-Mississippi Exposition.” Nebraska History 53 (1972): 312–29.

Auerbach, Jonathan. “McKinley at Home: How Early American Cinema Made News.” American Quarterly 51, no. 4 (1999): 797–832.

Batie, David L. “Thomas Rogers Kimball: Was He a Nebraska Architect?” Master’s thesis, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, 1977.

Baxter, Sylvester. “The Trans-Mississippi Exposition at Omaha.” Harper’s Weekly, October 30, 1897, 1080–82.

Beam, Patrice Kay. “The Last Victorian Fair: The Trans-Mississippi Exposition.” Journal of the American West 33, no. 1 (January 1994): 10–23.

Bebok, Horace M. “The First Continental Congress of North American Indians.” Midland Monthly Magazine 11 (February 1899): 102–11.

Bigart, Robert, and Clarence Woodcock. “The Rinehart Photographs: A Portfolio.” Montana: The Magazine of Western History 29, no. 4 (Autumn 1979): 24–37.

———. “The Trans-Mississippi Exposition and the Flathead Delegation.” Montana: The Magazine of Western History 29, no. 4 (Autumn 1979): 14–23.

Bolz, Peter. “More Questions than Answers: Frank A. Rinehart’s Photographs of American Indians.” European Review of Native American Studies 8, no. 2 (1994): 35–43.

Brennan, Sheila A. “Stamping American Memory: Stamp Collecting in the U.S., 1880s–1930s.” Master’s thesis, University of Notre Dame, 1996.

Cajka, Liz. Westward the Empire: Omaha’s World Fair of 1898. Omaha: University of Nebraska, 1998.

Carey, Grace. “Music at the Fair! The Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition. An Interactive Website.” Digital Commons @ University of Nebraska– Lincoln, 2006.

Clough, Josh. “‘Vanishing’ Indians? Cultural Persistence on Display at the Omaha World’s Fair of 1898.” Great Plains Quarterly 25, no. 2 (Spring 2005): 67–86.

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