The 101 Most Influential Coming-of-Age Movies

By Ryan Uytdewilligen | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 3. THE 1930S: GROWTH

Like a toddler, film rapidly grew in the following decade to reach its potential as a conscious and recognized industry.

As the United States tried to recover from the stock market crash in the “dirty thirties,” Adolf Hitler came to power in 1933 Nazi Germany. Around the globe, jobs were scarce, people were poor, and soup kitchens were full. But one place was booming with productivity and revenue as further technologies began to develop. That place was Hollywood.

Movie studios like MGM and Warner Brothers were working like mad to utilize the art of conversation now capable of being heard and seen on screen. The Academy Awards were a sought after prize for everyone in the industry which upped the standards and quality of a lot of films. Writers now had to come up with dialogue and actors had to memorize it. New jobs were available so it’s no doubt why many people moved out west to try their hand at the picture business. It marked the beginning of the Golden Age of Hollywood where real stories with emotion, tricky twists, and truer to life stories could be found on screen. Genres were evolving and the market was widening. Technicolor was becoming a real option, brightening up stories and wowing audiences with truly dazzling cinematography. The 1930s is what truly made Hollywood shine and take giant steps towards what we know it as today.

The youth of the time were busy helping their families survive. Many students were pulled out of school to help run family businesses and farms to keep them from failing. Everyone relied on each other to get by, so there was rarely time for fun. It was the era of Steinbeck’s Grapes of Wrath where many people had to give up everything, including being together to make ends meet. While radio still provided cheap entertainment to those who couldn’t afford or find a movie house, other technologies were again changing how people developed. Kodak helped institute another way pictures were taken with the use of Kodachrome. It indeed

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