The 101 Most Influential Coming-of-Age Movies

By Ryan Uytdewilligen | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 8. THE 1980S: COLLEGE

Movie-making had spent years seeking balance and identity, and now Hollywood made a shift towards higher value and production into entertainment. In a similar way, for many young people, especially those who go on to more schooling, this stage is often the most fun and exhilarating time in life. The 1980s represented a kind of high point for the youth movement after achieving more freedom and identity than ever before. By now the world had shifted and everything seemed to be catering to this age group.

The decade got off to rapid start with the launch of MTV in 1981, a revolutionary channel with music videos broadcasted all day long. It was hip, edgy, and loud; everything the young people wanted. The party hardy youngsters were busy hitting the dance floors like never before and having a good time. That’s exactly what advertisers and the entertainment industry worked hard to get across. Television was filled with sitcoms, the radio was dominated by pop legends like Michael Jackson and Madonna, and the film industry went for entertainment value over creative value and themes.

Thanks to Jaws and Stars Wars from the previous decade, it was now customary to release summer blockbusters that would have teenagers opening their wallets, or at least begging their parents to. These films were no doubt oriented towards the younger generation with new computer generated special effects and over the top action. Indiana Jones, Ghostbusters, Die Hard, and even the continuation of Star Wars is just a small example of big budget movies that exploded with popularity and high box offices results. Though a lot of these movies have since been identified as classics, high box office return resulted in a plethora of sequels to capitalize on success. In doing so, Hollywood started a trend and smaller dramas were a lot harder to make. Some filmmakers saw an opportunity and jumped to fill a void.

-105-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The 101 Most Influential Coming-of-Age Movies
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 200

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.