The 101 Most Influential Coming-of-Age Movies

By Ryan Uytdewilligen | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 9. THE 1990S: THE REAL WORLD

As new communication and entertainment technologies burst onto the scene, film built a new role for itself with a turn again toward the serious; and it began to tell important and more intimate stories.

The internet gave access to the World Wide Web in the early nineties, changing how everybody gained information, communicated, and even lived. The growing medium created quick messaging systems like email and quickly updated news. The film industry saw its opportunity and launched specific websites for movies to draw more attention and release never before seen bonus features. The younger generation took to it quickly, giving them a platform for comments and discussions on essentially any topic. And much like the previous generations, this one began took to take shape and act different. The nineties marked the dawn of the digital age where just about any question had an answer just a few clicks away. Video tape was still popular, but an easier method to sell a film became available towards the end of the decade, DVD’s (Digital Versatile Disc).

Students who completed college or post secondary found a rough and competitive job market out there. It would seem dreams and determination was not enough, and the eager career-hungry youths would have to sacrifice and change their goals. This created a whole different stage in coming of age where maturity seemed to be delayed. Generation X was confused, lost, and a little upset after finding what lay ahead for them after college were not the same opportunities their parent’s had. At the same time, the Seattle Grunge scene was rapidly moving across North America, led by edgier bands like Nirvana and Pearl Jam. Though popular with teens, the recent college grads embraced the alternative lifestyle that promoted individuality. The battle for a youthful voice had changed since the sixties to a battle for individual freedoms. People were eager to have their own voices and do what they chose to stand out. With tattoos, piercings, music, and clothing, the young people eagerly stood out as they figured

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