The 101 Most Influential Coming-of-Age Movies

By Ryan Uytdewilligen | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 10. THE 2000S: A NEW LIFE

Like young adults who have begun their careers and are building a life, film found its potential and established a larger role for itself in the world, with new technology and with stories it never knew it could tell.

The internet now almost completely controlled the aspects of business, entertainment, and everyday life. The traditional times of stereotypical young people talking on the phone and going on dates and parties were over. The internet paved the way for a platform called Social Media where people could post pictures and thoughts of themselves. From Myspace to the unfathomably popular Facebook and now more recently Twitter, lives were lived online. Popularity changed and young people were not “cool” unless they contributed to the online community. Chat rooms and video dating quickly became a way to court a mate while bullying took a whole new turn by sending anonymous comments or hurtful jabs from the comfort of one’s own home. Once popular radio saw a decline with the invention of ITunes that let people choose what they wanted to listen to and for how long. Kids had cell phones to theoretically call their parents to relay their every move. A good idea when it came to safety, but it ultimately destroyed the art of conversation and note passing with the creation of text messaging.

Technology also hit the film industry with both obstacles and fresh help. Sites like YouTube gave access to movie clips and possibly whole movies that viewers could watch in an instant. The war of illegal downloading had begun as studios fought hackers and websites that released their films for free, evading the film producers of payment. But with such a vast access to information, foreign films and small independent productions had a much bigger chance at getting seen. The rise in popularity of these smaller or rarer films let artists have near complete creative control over the stories, allowing for more intimate and daring subject matter.

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