The 101 Most Influential Coming-of-Age Movies

By Ryan Uytdewilligen | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 11. THE 2010S: THE UNKNOWN

And that’s how life is when we grow up and achieve our full potential: We now reach a point in cinema where amazing changes and new styles are popping up so fast, we can’t even anticipate what is to come.

Thus far the new century has been moving faster and faster, especially in terms of technology and “online” life. Facebook and Twitter are no longer the only social media platforms in town. Options like Instagram, Linkedin, Pinterest, and Tumblr populate the internet with services from picture sharing to Hollywood gossip. And that’s exactly what the public seems to want, and it’s not just teens. The whole world has made the shift to online life where videos and information can be downloaded in a matter of seconds. It hasn’t been long either since this changed how people went to movies.

In the nineteen twenties, it was a special occasion to go out and see a Nickelodeon at the theater. When television came into play, it forced films to offer something more grand and daring to compete. Now, people seem keen just to stay at home and watch something from a selection provided by the mega popular movie library site Netflix. Studios make films and television shows that could be released directly on to it, including full TV seasons. Film now lags behind the internet and seems to be losing the war with television — bigger budgets and creative freedom through cable seemingly means better storytelling. With computer screens and a more personal say of what you watched on television, the amount of time a person stars at a screen had reached an all time high. That’s not even including smart phones, which allows for all these features to be viewed in the palm of your hand. The invention of Kodachrome, some eighty years prior, had made picture taking achievable. Now, “self absorbed” youth are able to take hundreds of pictures a day — mostly of themselves and by themselves with the popularization of the “selfie.”

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