Awesome Families: The Promise of Healing Relationships in the International Churches of Christ

By Kathleen E. Jenkins | Go to book overview

CHAPTE R 5
Awesome Kids

We should pray for our children daily. Beyond all of the
wisdom, expertise, methods and words, God must
move! Before my children were born (or conceived!), I
prayed that they would one day give their lives to
Jesus. I still pray for them now, and I will continue to
do so until I die. Their names will always be held in
my prayers before the throne of God wherever they are
and whatever their spiritual condition.

—Laing and Laing (1994, 216)

I HAVE a photo of my youngest child sitting next to Pat’s youngest on her living room couch. Pat sends me a Christmas card every holiday season with a picture of her children. I had conversations with Pat and other City COC parents about the demands and joys of child rearing. It was clear in the moral world of the City COC, even though no one ever told me directly, that I was not doing all that I could to protect my children from the evil influences of secular society. Nor was I was making a serious effort to ensure my children would live on Earth and forever after in the Kingdom of God. The pressure to offer children the Kingdom of God (ICOC) was strong in group. I too live in a society where, as a parent, I am expected to do everything I possibly can to endow my children with a proper education and keep them safe from harm. I could feel the social control in their tacit judgment, even though I did not believe in their assessment or methods. With a look of calm and genuine relief, all parents I spoke with emphatically stated that they were sure that they would stay “close” with their children and that their children would be Christians throughout their lives. Pat and other members strongly believed that they had, in the discipling community, the best insurance policy available for keeping their children safe and on

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