Igniting the Spark: Library Programs That Inspire High School Patrons

By Roger Leslie; Patricia Potter Wilson | Go to book overview

About the Authors

Roger Leslie is an author, editor, teacher, library media specialist, and book reviewer with 15 years of experience in public education. Before becoming a school library media specialist, he taught all levels of secondary English and creative writing, served as department chairperson, and coached the Academic Decathlon team as well as several University Interscholastic League groups related to the humanities.

Many of his early writings came directly from his classroom experiences. He has published numerous educational articles in journals throughout the United States, including English in Texas, California English, and North Carolina English Teacher. His personal essays appear regularly in Texas Magazine, and two of his latest efforts are anthologized in Voices of Michigan, Volume 2 (MackinacJane’s, 2000) and Volume 3 (2001). Leslie is also a book reviewer for the Young Adult section of the American Library Association’s Booklist.

Leslie’s major works include history books, novels, biographies, and screenplays. A specialist in motivation and self-esteem building, he has recently returned to his teaching role by visiting classrooms and sharing concepts from his book, Train of Dreams: Your Journey to Success and Self-Discovery. His latest novel, Drowning in Secret, will be published by Absey & Company in spring 2002.

As both a writer and a teacher, Leslie has received many honors. A comic one-act play and his first published book, Galena Park: The Community That Shaped Its Own History (1993), brought him special recognition and local citizens’ awards. He also has received Teacher of the Year awards from such groups as Texas A & M University, The University of Texas, and Houston’s North Channel Chamber of Commerce. In 1989, Leslie was Galena Park I.S.D. District Teacher of the Year. He was featured on ABC News’s “Teachers Make a Difference” show, listed in Who’s Who Among America ‘s Teachers (1992–1996), and has been named one of the Outstanding Young Men of America for the past four years.

Dr. Patricia Potter Wilson is an associate professor in the School of Education at University of Houston-Clear Lake, where she teaches children’s literature and reference and supervises the internships in the School Library and Information Science Program.

An active member of professional organizations related to school libraries and reading, she is a frequent presenter at national and state conferences such as the American Association of School Librarians, National Council of Teachers of English, and International Reading Association. She was awarded the Texas Council of Teachers of English President’s Research Award and the Texas State Reading Association Research Award.

Her major research interest involves the examination of principal-preparation programs at universities to determine the amount of emphasis they place on school library media centers. Based on this research, she is currently designing a school library component that will be placed in the principal-preparation courses.

Dr. Wilson is the author of The Professional Collection for Elementary Educators (H. W. Wilson, 1996) and co-author of Happenings: Developing Successful Programs for School Libraries (Libraries Unlimited, 1987). She has published numerous articles related to teaching and research in professional journals such as School Library Journal, Reading Teacher, Journal of Youth Services, Reading Horizons, Teacher Librarian, National Forum

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