Conversations with Catalogers in the 21st Century

By Elaine R. Sanchez | Go to book overview

6    NF: A NEW FORMAT FOR METADATA

Bernhard Eversberg


WHAT IF WE HAD TO START FROM SCRATCH AND CREATE
A NEW FORMAT (NF) FOR METADATA?

MARC (Machine-Readable Cataloging) can and will evolve to contain bibliographic description and provide access for new formats of publications. But how long can this effectively be done? What if we started from scratch to create a new bibliographic record structure with none of MARC’s weaknesses, and with more flexibility and ease of use for computerized catalogs and future forms of digital data? This essay seeks to formulate design goals and principles that try to avoid some of the weaknesses and faults inherent in the MARC structure. Whereas in practice there will be no way to introduce a new format on a large scale, it can be instructive and helpful to see what might be envisioned in order to possibly accommodate today’s objectives and necessities. I have translated this vision into a new record format and structure, which I call NF, or New Format. It has been implemented with the allegro software package, my own development, to demonstrate simpler, less restrictive bibliographic and authority data formats. Examples of different types of records formatted in NF, that can be compared to MARC format, can be found in a sample database of over a million records located on the Internet at: http://www.biblio.tu-bs.de/db/a30/neutral.htm (a Flash-based application). Screenshots demonstrating how to access these examples are at the end of this essay.

-104-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Conversations with Catalogers in the 21st Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 283

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.