Conversations with Catalogers in the 21st Century

By Elaine R. Sanchez | Go to book overview

14    REALITIES OF STANDARDS IN THE
TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY

James Weinheimer

In a podcast of a panel debate, “There’s No Catalog Like No Catalog,”1 hosted by LITA (Library and Information Technology Association) at the ALA Annual 2008, you can hear a description of the library catalog. One of the panelists said that the library catalog is the greatest repository of the most “analretentive, obsessive-compulsive” activity that he had ever seen. While I won’t take issue with this assertion, what was interesting was the response from the audience: embarrassed laughter. I conclude from this that there is some sort of general agreement that anal-retentiveness in such a task is fundamentally a bad thing. This kind of attitude is understandable since terms like analretentiveness bring to mind such images as a baby sucking its thumb; and anyone unfortunate enough to be labeled anal-retentive is emotionally in the same early stage of development. This is in contrast to the fully developed adult who has a wider and ultimately better understanding of reality, and who—of course—can focus on more important and far more interesting topics.

I genuinely sympathize with this viewpoint, but I also find it rather strange. Blind adherence to standards is not such a bad thing in all cases. For example, I hope that when I am flying on an airplane, the airplane mechanics working on my plane are rather obsessive-compulsive about their work and they do not simply say, “Well, this isn’t quite right, but, it is good enough.” Or if someone is working on the roof of my house, I hope the carpenter doesn’t say, “Well, it’s too much trouble to see how these pieces are supposed to fit together. I’ll just use this nail I have handy.”

I suspect there are several people out there who would agree on this point, and they would join me in hoping (and expecting) that the professionals whom we rely upon would put out some extra effort to check and follow the standard

-188-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Conversations with Catalogers in the 21st Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 283

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.