The Reading and Preaching of the Scriptures in the Worship of the Christian Church - Vol. 5

By Hughes Oliphant Old | Go to book overview

CHAPTER I
Moderatism

Moderatism has been a very creative force in the Protestant pulpit even if it all too often has been misunderstood by church historians. Much more attention has been given to the more extreme movements of the eighteenth century, Deism and pietism. One is usually content to read the more moderate preachers of the period and discover premonitions of the Enlightenment or the first intimations of pietism. All too many who have studied the preaching of the eighteenth century figure it was a century when the Church got badly off the track, wandering either into rationalism or emotionalism. A more careful look shows us that not everyone went off to the extremes. Some very strong voices held the middle ground and steadfastly refused to go off with either movement. Pietism was a well-defined movement; Deism even more so. Moderatism, on the other hand, distinguishes itself more subtly. Perhaps it was not so much a movement as a refusal to go off to extremes. It was just mainline Protestantism with no particular flag of its own. It is only in looking back at it that we find a term for it, much less a definition. This can be seen quite quickly when we look at some of the leading representatives of the school.

Moderatism was a response to certain widely felt needs the Church began to feel toward the end of the seventeenth century. By that time Protestantism had lost its novelty. It was a permanent feature of European Christianity. No longer did it have to prove its right to exist. Even if Louis XIV revoked the Edict of Nantes, even if James II ascended the throne of England, Protestantism was going to survive. It had won the hearts of a significant portion of the population of Christendom.

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The Reading and Preaching of the Scriptures in the Worship of the Christian Church - Vol. 5
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface xiii
  • Chapter I - Moderatism 1
  • Chapter II - The Awakenings of Eighteenth-Century Pietism 69
  • Chapter III - New England 168
  • Chapter IV - Preaching in the Austro-Hungarian Empire 294
  • Chapter V - Franciscan Preaching in Spanish California 351
  • Chapter VI - Romanian Orthodoxy under the Turks 367
  • Chapter VII - The Russian Orthodox Church 389
  • Chapter VIII - Scotland 429
  • Chapter IX - Evangelical Anglicanism 541
  • Bibliography 579
  • Index 601
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