Shiptown: Between Rural and Urban North India

By Ann Grodzins Gold | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I am grateful for the generous support of a Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad Fellowship for my 2010–11 fieldwork. I was affiliated with the Institute for Development Studies in Jaipur, where Varsha Joshi served as my advisor; she and the late Surjit Singh, who was then IDS director, were supremely generous with their time and guidance. In academic year 2014–15 a fellowship from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation supported the writing of Shiptown, and a residential fellowship from the National Humanities Center gave me the perfect space in which to work— not to mention unparalleled library services, congenial interdisciplinary company, and luscious cookies. I am extraordinarily grateful to the College of Arts and Sciences at Syracuse University, which has generously supported both my research and the production of this book. I thank my former department chair Jim Watts for his administrative gifts, and our office manager Debbie Pratt for inimitable and tireless path-smoothing and spirit-soothing services. Discretionary funds from the Thomas J. Watson Chair (to which I was appointed while in India in 2011) allowed me to make three return visits to Rajasthan, sustaining connections with people and place. At University of Pennsylvania Press, Peter Agree has offered stalwart support for this project from its inception, while Amanda Rose Ruffner and Noreen O’Connor-Abel have seen its preparation through several laborious stages. For all such bounty my gratitude is boundless and ongoing. I can only feel abashed that so much good fortune has been mine in these straitened and challenging times in academia.

Colleagues, students, friends, and family members have helped me in numberless ways since I began to imagine a project in Jahazpur, to the final stages of producing a readable text. Every interaction makes a difference for the better, and I am grateful to editors, reviewers, readers, and listeners. My attempt to acknowledge every person who contributed will certainly

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Shiptown: Between Rural and Urban North India
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Contemporary Ethnography ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I- Origins, Gateways, Dwellings, Routes, Histories 15
  • Chapter 1- Legends of Names, Snakes, and Compassion 17
  • Chapter 2- Entries Five Gates and a Window 29
  • Chapter 3- Colony Suburban Satisfaction 65
  • Chapter 4- Streets Everyone Loves a Parade 101
  • Chapter 5- Depths Minas and Jains Inside, outside, Underground 153
  • Part II- Ecology, Love, Money 187
  • Chapter 6- questioning Landscapes of Trees and a River 189
  • Chapter 7- Teaching Hearts a Triple Wedding 211
  • Chapter 8- Talking Business Commerce and Cosmology 247
  • Epilogue- Wondrous Jahazpur 278
  • Notes 287
  • Glossary 305
  • References 307
  • Index 319
  • Acknowledgments 329
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