The JPS Rashi Discussion Torah Commentary

By Steven; Sarah Levy | Go to book overview

DEVARIM

❖ Veiled Criticism
Kent State, Watergate, Tiananmen Square—the mere mention of these places calls to mind national calamity and questions of personal conduct. Moses makes references to such places in his address to the Israelites before they enter the Land of Israel.

These are the words that Moses addressed to all Israel
on the other side of the Jordan.—Through the wilderness,
in the Arabah near Suph, between Paran and Tophel, Laban,
Hazeroth, and Di-zahab. (Deut. 1:1)

Rashi explains the relevance of the place-names, whose significance is otherwise not clear:

These are the words: Because these are words of rebuke and
he [Moses] enumerates here all the places where they [the Is-
raelites] angered the Omnipresent, he therefore makes no ex-
plicit mention of the incidents [in which they transgressed],
but rather merely alludes to them [by mentioning the names
of the places], out of respect for Israel. (Rashi, Deut. 1:1)

As Rashi explains, Moses wishes to rebuke the Jewish nation and simultaneously to preserve the Israelites’ honor. Therefore, he does not mention the people’s transgressions, but cites the places where the incidents occurred.Offering constructive criticism effectively is one of the most difficult things to do. Unless the person offering criticism exercises great discretion, the listener is liable to perceive it as an attack, become defensive, justify his or her conduct, and avenge hurt feelings. To avoid this destructive cycle, researchers in the field recommend that the person offering the criticism (1) describe the problematic conduct as specifically as possible and (2) direct the criticism toward the behavior rather than the person. Additionally, as the Torah’s example emphasizes, preserving the other person’s dignity should be a foremost concern.
Questions for Discussion
1. “Kent State” refers to the Ohio National Guard’s fatal shooting of four students protesting the Vietnam War at Kent State University in 1970. “Watergate” refers to the bungled 1972 break-in at the Democratic National Committee headquarters located within the Watergate office complex, which led to an investigation that ultimately implicated President Richard Nixon and led to his 1974 resignation. “Tiananmen Square” refers to China’s violent killing of hundreds of antigovernment protestors in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square in 1989. Are there any government scandals you would add to this list? If so, what was

-149-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The JPS Rashi Discussion Torah Commentary
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xiii
  • Introduction - Introducing Rashi xv
  • Genesis 1
  • Bere’shit 3
  • NoaḤ 6
  • Lekh Lekha 9
  • Va-Yera’ 12
  • Hayyei Sarah 15
  • Toledot 18
  • Va-Yetse’ 21
  • Va-YishlaḤ 24
  • Va-Yeshev 27
  • Mikkets 30
  • Va-Yiggash 33
  • Va-YeḤi 36
  • Exodus 39
  • Shemot 41
  • Val-‘Era’ 44
  • Bo’ 47
  • Be-ShallaḤ 50
  • Yitro 53
  • Mishpatim 56
  • Terumah 59
  • Tetsavveh 62
  • Ki Tissa’ 65
  • Va-Yak’Hel 68
  • Pekudei 71
  • Leviticus 75
  • Va-Yikra’ 77
  • Tsav 80
  • Shemini 83
  • Tazria’ 86
  • Metsora’ 90
  • ’AḤarei Mot 93
  • Kedoshim 97
  • ‘Emor 100
  • Be-Har 103
  • Be-Ḥukkotai 106
  • Numbers 111
  • Be-Midbar 113
  • Naso’ 116
  • Be-Ha’Alotekha 120
  • ShelaḤ-Lekha 123
  • KoraḤ 127
  • Ḥukkat 130
  • Balak 134
  • PinḤas 138
  • Mattot 141
  • Mase’Ei 144
  • Deuteronomy 147
  • Devarim 149
  • Va-EtḤannan 152
  • ‘Ekev 156
  • Re’Eh 160
  • Shofetim 163
  • Ki Tetse’ 167
  • Ki Tavo’ 171
  • Nits Avim/Va-Yelekh 174
  • Ha’Azinu 177
  • Ve-Zo’t Ha-Berakhah 181
  • Subject Index 185
  • Index of Sources 189
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 194

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.