From Telegrapher to Titan: The Life of William C. Van Horne

By Valerie Knowles | Go to book overview

Afterword

In his will, Van Horne stipulated that his wife, Addie, within six months of his death, “relinquish, renounce and abandon in favour of his estate all rights of dower, community rights and other rights whatsoever, if any, arising out of marriage.” In lieu of such rights and in addition to certain bequests, she was to have the use and the enjoyment of the Sherbrooke Street mansion and its contents for three years after his death should she survive him. He also bequeathed to Addie the sum of $30,000 per annum to maintain the residence. Addie subsequently renounced all matrimonial rights and accepted the legacies made in her favour.

Van Horne also provided under his will for the maintenance of his Sherbrooke Street mansion. “I should like said house and premises to continue to be used as a family residence (unless the neighbourhood should for any reason become undesirable for such purpose) for my wife and children and the survivors of them but this is only a suggestion and not obligatory.”

To his beloved daughter Addie, Van Horne conveyed Covenhoven, its furniture and art collections, the animals, and all his real estate on Minister’s Island. He bequeathed all the residue of his estate to his wife “for one third or four twelfths (4/12),” to “Bennie (or his issue representing him par souche) for five twelfths (5/12)” and to his daughter “(or her issue representing her par souche) for three twelfths (3/12),” thereby making his wife, daughter, and son his “Universal Residuary Legatees & Devisees in full ownership” from time of death with the exception of one third of each of his son’s and daughter’s shares, which were to be held in trust by the Royal Trust Company.

Van Horne also made provision for his cherished grandson, stipulating that the sum of $20,000 be placed in the hands of the Royal Trust and held in trust for William. The sum was to be invested by the company and the interest used for the education and support of his grandson until he

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From Telegrapher to Titan: The Life of William C. Van Horne
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Table of Contents 7
  • Preface 9
  • Acknowledgements 11
  • Prologue 13
  • Chapter One - Growing Up in Frontier Illinois 17
  • Chapter Two - Early Career 37
  • Chapter Three - Rapid Advancement 55
  • Chapter Four - New Challenges and Hobbies 83
  • Chapter Five - New Horizons 95
  • Chapter Six - Toward the Last Spike 117
  • Chapter Seven - Cutting Costs 147
  • Chapter Eight - The Final Push 175
  • Chapter Nine - All That Grant Was to the U.S.a 209
  • Chapter Ten - Van Horne at the Helm 239
  • Chapter Eleven - Art for Art’s Sake 283
  • Chapter Twelve - Family Matters 299
  • Chapter Thirteen - Cuba Beckons 325
  • Chapter Fourteen - Building the Cuba Railroad 339
  • Chapter Fifteen - Chasing the Money 367
  • Chapter Sixteen - Dodging the Grim Reaper 397
  • Afterword 429
  • Bibliography 433
  • Notes 443
  • Index 495
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