Music, Authorship, and the Book in the First Century of Print

By Kate Van Orden | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION

1. “Memini summum quendam virum dicere, Josquinum iam vita defunctum, plures cantilenas aedere, quam dum vita superstes esset,” Selectissimarum mutetarum … tomus primus(Nuremberg: Petreius, 1540), fol. 2r. On the Forster preface, see Stephanie P. Schlagel, “A Credible (Mis)Attribution to Josquin in Hans Ott’s Novum et insigne opus musicum: Contemporary Perceptions, Modern Conceptions, and the Case of Veni sancte Spiritus,” Tijdschrift van de Koninklijke Vereniging voor Nederlandse Muziekgeschiedenis56 (2006): 97–126, at 101.

2. The prints by Ott that kicked off the trend were Novum et insigne opus musicum (Nuremberg, 1537) and Secundus tomus novi operis musici (Nuremberg, 1538).

3. On the history of Josquin’s chansons in print and the ways in which his authorship was configured in vernacular repertoires, see Kate van Orden, “Josquin, Renaissance Historiography, and the Cultures of Print,” in The Oxford Handbook to the New Cultural History of Music, ed. Jane Fair Fulcher (New York: Oxford University Press, 2011), 354–80.

4. See Stanley Boorman, Ottaviano Petrucci: A Catalogue Raisonné (New York: Oxford University Press, 2006), 274–76, 477–84.

5. See the definition in Antoine Furetière, Dictionnaire universel, 3 vols. (The Hague and Rotterdam: Arnout and Reinier Leers, 1690), 1:fol. V3r. Also see Roger Chartier, “Figures of the Author,” in The Order of Books: Readers, Authors, and Libraries in Europe between the Fourteenth and Eighteenth Centuries, trans. Lydia G. Cochrane (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1994), 25–59.

6. Other single-composer books of music have not have survived. But see the fascinating reconstruction of two such manuscripts in Alejandro Enrique Planchart, “The Books that Guillaume Du Fay Left to the Chapel of Saint Stephen,” in Sine Musica Nulla Disciplina … Studi in Onore de Giulio

-159-

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Music, Authorship, and the Book in the First Century of Print
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The World of Books 19
  • 2 - Music Books and Their Authors 30
  • 3 - Authors of Lyric 69
  • 4 - The Book of Poetry Becomes a Book of Music 103
  • 5 - Resisting the Press- Performance 143
  • Notes 159
  • Select Bibliography 207
  • Index 233
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