Oliver Mtukudzi: Living Tuku Music in Zimbabwe

By Jennifer W. Kyker | Go to book overview

SEVEN
What Shall We Do?:
Music, Dialogue, and HIV/AIDS

In December 2008, the National Gallery of Zimbabwe hosted the Auxilia Chimusoro Awards, an annual event named after one of the country’s first women to publicly disclose her HIV-positive status. Timed to coincide with World AIDS Day, observed internationally on December 1st, the award ceremony brought together a diverse array of approaches to HIV/AIDS. At a display of herbal remedies, representatives of The Centre, a local organization that supports people without access to antiretroviral medications (ARVs), mingled with employees of the US Agency for International Development, one of the event’s major sponsors.1 Nearby, invited guests browsed an exhibit of AIDS posters from around the world, accompanied by a set of banners reflecting Zimbabwean experiences of the disease. Echoing the connections between hunhu, self-discipline, and moral relations, one read simply, “It has made me a whole lot more disciplined than I would have expected of myself.” In the gallery’s light-filled mezzanine, guests passed between white columns adorned with red ribbons, widely recognized as symbols of support for people infected and affected by HIV/AIDS. Filtering between rows of chairs, they seated themselves in front of a small stage, where Mtukudzi performed two short sets bookending the ceremony. Behind him, a large banner emblazoned with Auxilia Chimusoro’s image hung above a row of posters featuring Mtukudzi himself, accompanied by the slogan “Don’t be negative about being positive.”

For radio DJ Leander Kandiero, who was among those honored with an award for his pioneering radio show Aid on AIDS, Mtukudzi’s performance proved the most powerful moment of the ceremony:

I walked in. It was actually overwhelming … When you see that this is Aux-
ilia Chimusoro awards, HIV and AIDS is the issue. And people who work
towards an HIV free generation, who work around HIV and AIDS, have
been invited. And you think, someone as big as Oliver, who has taken the
message not only across Zimbabwe, but even outside Zimbabwean borders,
is there, and he’s performing, and he’s sitting right in front of you. And you
think, “Wow … there’s a man who has said so much, and done so much
to do with HIV and AIDS. And he’s an icon, an international icon, and he’s

-169-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Oliver Mtukudzi: Living Tuku Music in Zimbabwe
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction - The Art of Determination 3
  • One - Hwaro/Foundations 31
  • Two - Performing the Nation’s History 59
  • Three - Singing Hunhu after Independence 85
  • Four - Neria- Singing the Politics of Inheritance 109
  • Five - Return to Dande 127
  • Six - Listening as Politics 147
  • Seven - What Shall We Do?- Music, Dialogue, and HIV/AIDS 169
  • Eight - Listening in the Wilderness 203
  • Conclusion - I Have Finished My Portion of the Field 219
  • Notes 227
  • Bibliography 257
  • Index 275
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 292

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.