Oliver Mtukudzi: Living Tuku Music in Zimbabwe

By Jennifer W. Kyker | Go to book overview

NOTES

Epigraph

The Papers of Martin Luther King, Jr., Volume V: Threshold of a New Decade, January 1959– December 1960, ed. Clayborne Carson (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2005).


Introduction

1. For a historical account of the nyunga nyunga, see Tracey (1961). For more on the Zimbabwean marimba, see Axelsson (1973) and Jones (2006).

2. Directed by South African Brett Bailey, “Dreamland” featured Bernie Bismark as musical director, Marie-Laure Soukaina Edom as choreographer, and Sue Powell as production manager.

3. “A Dream with a Message (HIFA Opening Concert),” http://www.fungaijames .com/bloggen/2008/04/29/a-dream-with-a-message-hifa-opening-concert/ (Accessed 20 July 2012).

4. Diawara (1997), 41.

5. Operation Murambatsvina, which literally translates as “Drive out filth,” was a state-sponsored urban clean-up campaign with devastating social and economic effects, conducted in May 2005. See for example Vambe (2008).

6. For one account of how the ngoromera charm was used in Bulawayo during the 1920s, see Msindo (2006).

7. Terence Ranger (2006) has suggested that the rise of “mangoromera culture” in Matabeleland was a response to changing social relations in the mid-twentieth century. As Hove has similarly observed, the “wayward, the stubborn, the disobedient and several other anti-social elements, used the Mangoromera craze as a backhand blow on established conventions, which their elders religiously adhered to without question. Faction fights, that had hitherto been confined to urban and industrial areas at weekends and on holidays, had moved to villages out in the rural areas. Many slight arguments and disputes quickly developed into duels or faction fights … many people resorted to talking about their ability to box and the sharp sting of their boxing” (1985, 121).

8. NADA (1933).

9. In his description of the song, for example, Murenga Chikowero observes, “The concluding refrain ngatiwirirane (let us deliberate and come to an agreement) captures the ever-evolving nature of political and social relationships, that is, they are constantly shifting and as such, can only be maintained by being regularly and carefully re-negotiated” (2006, 41).

-227-

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Oliver Mtukudzi: Living Tuku Music in Zimbabwe
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction - The Art of Determination 3
  • One - Hwaro/Foundations 31
  • Two - Performing the Nation’s History 59
  • Three - Singing Hunhu after Independence 85
  • Four - Neria- Singing the Politics of Inheritance 109
  • Five - Return to Dande 127
  • Six - Listening as Politics 147
  • Seven - What Shall We Do?- Music, Dialogue, and HIV/AIDS 169
  • Eight - Listening in the Wilderness 203
  • Conclusion - I Have Finished My Portion of the Field 219
  • Notes 227
  • Bibliography 257
  • Index 275
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