Oliver Mtukudzi: Living Tuku Music in Zimbabwe

By Jennifer W. Kyker | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Books, Dissertations, Reports, and Articles

Achebe, Chinua. 2000. Home and Exile. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Adams, Charles R. 1979. “Aurality and Consciousness: Basotho Production of Significance.” In Essays in Humanistic Anthropology, edited by Bruce T. Grindal and Dennis M. Warren, 303–325. Washington, DC: University Press of America.

Agawu, Kofi. 2003. Representing African Music: Postcolonial Notes, Queries, Positions. London: Routledge.

Alexander, Jocelyn. 2006. The Unsettled Land: State-making and the Politics of Land in Zimbabwe, 1893–2003. Oxford: James Currey.

Alviso, Ric. 2011. “Tears Run Dry: Coping with AIDS through Music in Zimbabwe.” In The Culture of AIDS in Africa: Hope and Healing through the Arts, edited by Gregory Barz and Judah Cohen, 56–62. New York: Oxford University Press.

Amnesty International. 1976. “Amnesty International Briefing: Rhodesia/Zimbabwe.” Journal of Opinion 6 (4): 591–610.

Andersson, Jens A. 2001. “Reinterpreting the Rural-Urban Connection: Migration Practices and Socio-Cultural Dispositions of Buhera Workers in Harare.” Africa 71 (1): 82–112.

Aparicio, Frances. 1998. Listening to Salsa: Gender, Latin Popular Music, and Puerto Rican Cultures. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press.

Appadurai, Arjun. 1996. Modernity at Large: Cultural Dimensions of Globalization. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

——— . 2013. The Future as Cultural Fact: Essays on the Global Condition. New York: Verso.

Axelsson, Olof. 1973. “Kwanongoma College of Music: Rhodesian Music Center for Research and Education.” Svensk Tidskrift for Musikforskning 55: 59–67.

Azim, Erica. 1999. “On Teaching Americans to Play Mbira like Zimbabweans.” African Music 7 (4): 175–180.

Barber, Karin. 1987. “Popular Arts in Africa.” African Studies Review 30 (3): 1–78.

——— . 1991. I Could Speak until Tomorrow: Oriki, Women, and the Past in a Yoruba Town. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press.

Barz, Gregory. 2006. Singing for Life: HIV/AIDS and Music in Uganda. New York: Routledge.

Baumann, Max, and Linda Fujie. 1999. “Preface from the Editors.” World of Music 41 (1): 5–7.

Bayart, Jean-Francois. 1993. The State in Africa: The Politics of the Belly. London: Longman.

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Oliver Mtukudzi: Living Tuku Music in Zimbabwe
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction - The Art of Determination 3
  • One - Hwaro/Foundations 31
  • Two - Performing the Nation’s History 59
  • Three - Singing Hunhu after Independence 85
  • Four - Neria- Singing the Politics of Inheritance 109
  • Five - Return to Dande 127
  • Six - Listening as Politics 147
  • Seven - What Shall We Do?- Music, Dialogue, and HIV/AIDS 169
  • Eight - Listening in the Wilderness 203
  • Conclusion - I Have Finished My Portion of the Field 219
  • Notes 227
  • Bibliography 257
  • Index 275
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