Dissent in the Heartland: The Sixties at Indiana University

By Mary Ann Wynkoop | Go to book overview

Epilogue to the New Edition

In August 2013, I attended a reunion of Indiana University activists from the 1960s and 1970s. Organized by two IU alumni, Cathy Rountree and David Martin, along with assistance from the IU Archives and the Office of the President, activists from around the country gathered in Bloomington to reminisce, get reacquainted, and renew old bonds that lasted over time and distance.

It was a strangely rewarding event for me because while I was not technically an alumna and had only read or heard about the experience in newspaper accounts, archival records, or in conversations with participants, I often felt like I had been on campus during those times. It was wonderful to see people I had interviewed years ago and equally interesting to meet others whom I corresponded with or read about. I was finally able to put faces with names.

In addition to opportunities for telling stories, eating, drinking, singing along with activist/musician Roger Saloom with his everpresent guitar, and laughing (sometimes all at the same time), there was one day of panel discussions about the issues of the times that provoked spontaneous contributions from panelists and listeners alike. One of the highlights for me was to meet two of the Bloomington 3 whom I discuss in an early chapter about the Fair Play for Cuba march and who gained national fame through their prolonged legal battle with Monroe County’s Prosecuting Attorney. There were also panels devoted to political activism and Bloomington events.

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