The Rigor of Things: Conversations with Dan Arbib

By Dan Arbib; Jean-Luc Marion et al. | Go to book overview

and the Swiss theologian Hans Urs von Balthasar. Marion’s earlier work in philosophical theology, beginning years ago with his influential book God Without Being, has increased in recent years, augmenting his writing for and editorial work in the French edition of the distinguished journal Communio. He has also written a major essay on Dionysus the Areopagite and more recently a brilliant book on Augustine. His present and future work at the University of Chicago as well as at the Institut Catholique in Paris will, so he tells his readers, address the history of theological reflection from the second-century Logos theologian Justin Martyr forward through the history of early Christian theology, including Tertullian and Clement of Alexandria.

Jean-Luc Marion’s range, his phenomenological acuity, his unusual skill in explication du texte, his hermeneutical care in intellectual history, and his originality on givenness, gift, and saturated phenomena have made Marion one of the most important thinkers of our period.

So much is this the case that nine years ago France awarded Professor Marion its highest honor, election to the Académie Française; the next year, Italy elected him to the Accademia dei Lincei; and the year after that Germany awarded him the Karl Jaspers annual prize for philosophy.

These brilliant interviews fill in many personal and intellectual details for Anglophone readers, just as the original French publication performed that service so successfully for his readers in France.

Indeed, in recalling the many intellectual paths—philosophy, intellectual history, theology—to which Professor Marion has contributed in major ways, I began to ask myself how such unrelenting productivity and creativity in these major fields is possible. Well, as the Scholastics rightfully declared, Ab esse ad posse valet illatio. These interviews help clarify the range and depth of Jean-Luc Marion’s amazing work.

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The Rigor of Things: Conversations with Dan Arbib
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xi
  • Translator’s Note xiii
  • 1- My Path 1
  • 2- Descartes 40
  • 3- Phenomenology 71
  • 4- Theology 106
  • 5- A Matter of Method 134
  • 6- The World as It Runs—And as It Doesn’T 162
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