Style: Essays on Renaissance and Restoration Language and Culture in Memory of Harriet Hawkins

By Allen Michie; Eric Buckley | Go to book overview

Contributors

MARTINE WATSON BROWNLEY is Goodrich C. White Professor of English and Winship Distinguished Research Professor at Emory University, where she is also Director of the Center for Humanistic Inquiry. She has published on Clarendon and Gibbon, and her most recent book is Deferrals of Domain: Contemporary Women Novelists and the State (2000).

JOHN CAREY is Emeritus Merton Professor of English Literature at Oxford University. His books include studies of Donne, Milton, Dickens, and Thackeray, also The Intellectuals and the Masses (1992) and Pure Pleasure (2001).

MAURICE CHARNEY is Distinguished Professor of English at Rutgers University. He has been President of the Shakespeare Association of America and the Academy of Literary Studies. He also received the Medal of the City of Tours in France. Some publications are Shakespeare on Love and Lust (2000) and All of Shakespeare (1993), Style in Hamlet (1969), Shakespeare’s Roman Plays: the Function of Imagery in the Drama (1961), and Comedy High and Low: an Introduction to the Experience of Comedy (1978). He also published a critical book on Joe Orton (1984) and a study of Titus Andronicus (1990).

MANUEL J. GÓMEZ-LARA is a Senior Lecturer of the Department of English and American Literature at Seville University. His publications include The Ways of the Word: an Advanced Course on Reading and the Analysis of Literary Texts(1994), Stylistica: I Semana de Estudios Estilísticos (1987), and several books and essays on Baroque public ceremonies and medieval, Renaissance and Restoration English Drama. He has co-edited Shadwell’s The Virtuoso (1997) and Epsom Wells (2000), as well as J. Arrowsmith’s The Reformation(2003). At the moment he is engaged in “The Restoration Comedy Project,” a collaborative work aimed at compiling a full catalogue of comedies written between 1660 and 1700, and editing neglected plays from the period.

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