Fordham, a History of the Jesuit University of New York: 1841-2003

By Thomas J. Shelley | Go to book overview

2
FOUNDING FATHER

John Hughes

John Hughes was born in Annalogan, County Tyrone, Ireland, on June 24, 1797. The son of a poor Ulster farmer, he had to abandon school early in life in order to support his family. “They told me when I was a boy,” he said, “that for the first five days I was on a social and civil equality with the most favored subject of the British Empire. These five days would be the interval between my birth and my baptism.”1 Once he was baptized a Catholic, like every eighteenth-century Irish Catholic, John Hughes became a second-class citizen in the land of his birth. Hughes emigrated to America in 1817 and found work as a quarryman and day laborer. When he applied for admission to a seminary in 1819, his educational background was so deficient that he had to spend a year in remedial studies before he was accepted as a candidate for the priesthood.

Ordained a priest for the diocese of Philadelphia on October 15, 1826, Hughes was made a bishop only twelve years later. On January 7, 1838, he was consecrated the coadjutor, or assistant bishop, of New York to assist the ailing Bishop John Dubois, the former seminary rector who had rejected his original application to Mount St. Mary’s College and Seminary in Emmitsburg, Maryland. Hughes succeeded Dubois as the fourth bishop of New York on the latter’s death on December 20, 1842, and was appointed the first archbishop of New York on July 19, 1850.

John Hughes believed passionately in the necessity of Catholic higher education, as did another founding father, John Carroll, first bishop and archbishop of Baltimore, who, more than any other individual, was responsible for the establishment of Georgetown College between 1786 and 1791. As far back as 1783 Carroll had said that “the object nearest my heart is to establish a college on this continent for the education of youth which might at the same time be a seminary for future clergymen.” He called

1. John Hassard, Life of the Most Reverend John Hughes, First Archbishop of New
York
(New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1866), 17–18. Hassard was a graduate of St.
John’s College, Fordham, class of 1855.

-5-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Fordham, a History of the Jesuit University of New York: 1841-2003
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 524

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.