Fordham, a History of the Jesuit University of New York: 1841-2003

By Thomas J. Shelley | Go to book overview

13
FORDHAM DOWNTOWN, UPTOWN,
ALL AROUND THE TOWN

Downtown

When the Law School, the Graduate School, and the School of Sociology and Social Service all took up residence in the Woolworth Building in 1916, it was the beginning of a major expansion of Fordham in downtown Manhattan. Within a decade “Fordham Downtown” would also include a teachers’ college, business school, graduate school, Fordham College (Manhattan Division), summer school, the short-lived School of Irish Studies, and a dozen university centers. “University centers” was a euphemism for satellite campuses located as far away as Passaic, New Jersey.

The Woolworth Building, only three years old in 1916 and the tallest building in the world at the time, was an ideal location for the home of a commuter school in New York City. It was located at the hub of a dense network of transportation facilities that included five elevated lines (including one on the Brooklyn Bridge) and the East Side IRT subway. Together these mass transit facilities provided easy access to upper Manhattan, the Bronx, Queens, and Brooklyn for the price of the sacrosanct nickel fare that no politician dared to disturb. In addition, within walking distance of the Woolworth Building were the Hudson Tubes to Hoboken and Newark (today’s PATH lines), the Staten Island ferry, and five Hudson River railroad ferries that deposited passengers on the New Jersey shore at the terminals of their respective companies as far north as Weehawken.

Father Gannon gave much of the credit for the rapid expansion of the schools at Fordham Downtown to three talented and energetic Jesuits: Father Matthew L. Fortier (who originally served as dean of both the Graduate School and the School of Sociology and Social Service) and Father Michael Jessup and Father R. Rush Rankin, both of whom returned to Fordham in 1919 after service as chaplains in World War I. In Gannon’s words, Rush Rankin was “dean of everything” at Fordham Downtown except the Law School and the School of Social Service from 1920 to 1926. A lay faculty member described him tellingly as “a pep-

-281-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Fordham, a History of the Jesuit University of New York: 1841-2003
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 524

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.