Hudson's Heritage: A Chronicle of the Founding and the Flowering of the Village of Hudson, Ohio

By Grace Goulder Izant | Go to book overview

THE COMING OF
THE ELLSWORTHS

ELISHA ELLSWORTH WAS twenty-five and homesick. He missed his girl wife, Harriet (often called Harriet Elizabeth), and their baby, also named Harriet. He had left them back in Connecticut with his wife’s parents, the Benjamin Oviatts. This was to be a brief stopover in Hudson. Ellsworth’s father-in-law was one of the three who had bought into the township a few years before, acquiring a small part of it and the status of proprietor along with David Hudson and the Nortons.

Elisha was on the way to New Orleans to market a consignment of Goshen cheese, including the famous pineapple-shaped variety that Birdsey Norton was promoting. Young Ellsworth was one of the merchants taking advantage of the opening of the port of New Orleans to American shipping as a result of the Louisiana Purchase

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Hudson's Heritage: A Chronicle of the Founding and the Flowering of the Village of Hudson, Ohio
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Table of Contents iii
  • About the Author iv
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Preface vii
  • … as the Last British Troops Were Putting out to Sea … 1
  • The Father of the Western Reserve 9
  • Land Fever and Three Wives 14
  • David Hudson’s First Western Acres 21
  • The Land Company Learns about Its Purchase 29
  • The Great Real Estate Lottery 34
  • The Howling Wilderness 41
  • Hudson’s First Settlers Arrive 50
  • … and a New Town Came into Being 58
  • Salvation in a Saddlebag 69
  • The Bacons 77
  • John Brown Comes to Hudson 89
  • The Coming of the Ellsworths 99
  • The War of 1812 106
  • A Fine New Church 116
  • Dianthe 122
  • Mary Anne 132
  • Western Reserve College 145
  • The First College Presidents 157
  • David Hudson Junior and the New Doctor 167
  • Hudson Dies, College Expands, Village Incorporates 188
  • A New Ellsworth Baby and Hudson’s Railroad Era 199
  • The Return 210
  • Epilogue 227
  • Notes to Text and Illustrations 254
  • Index 273
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