Hudson's Heritage: A Chronicle of the Founding and the Flowering of the Village of Hudson, Ohio

By Grace Goulder Izant | Go to book overview

A FINE NEW CHURCH

AS HUDSON’S POPULATION grew so did membership in the Calvinistic Congregational Church. Clearly the village had outgrown the little log church on the green. A small group of citizens, affiliates of denominations less rigid in doctrine, had formed the Union Church, which they hoped would become a community church on ecumenical lines. In 1817 they put up a small frame building on the west side of Main Street. This church was regarded as practically an act of apostasy by most of the townspeople. It was shortlived and little data about it survives.

The little church’s presence in their midst may have nudged the Congregationalists to action: it was becoming clear to them a new edifice was called for. The lot where the Village Hall now stands was selected as the site. Heman Oviatt owned the land and it was hoped he would donate it, especially as he was a deacon of the church, the second so honored after David Hudson. Oviatt, however, felt differently, explaining he already had subscribed generously to the building fund.

After a two-year impasse over the issue David Hudson and Owen Brown called on him, and by each paying him five dollars secured the deed to the property. Oviatt stipulated that timber, long cut for the proposed church and piled beside his store on Main Street must be removed before midnight of a specified day. Dr. Moses Thompson, generally considered “an infidel,” managed with the help of his son to get the lumber to the church site just within the appointed hour.

The doctor, whether an unbeliever or not, seems to have been on the building committee and wanted the church to have a belfry. Accordingly he loaded his wagon with cheese, in which he dealt extensively along with his physician’s duties, and drove to

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Hudson's Heritage: A Chronicle of the Founding and the Flowering of the Village of Hudson, Ohio
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Table of Contents iii
  • About the Author iv
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Preface vii
  • … as the Last British Troops Were Putting out to Sea … 1
  • The Father of the Western Reserve 9
  • Land Fever and Three Wives 14
  • David Hudson’s First Western Acres 21
  • The Land Company Learns about Its Purchase 29
  • The Great Real Estate Lottery 34
  • The Howling Wilderness 41
  • Hudson’s First Settlers Arrive 50
  • … and a New Town Came into Being 58
  • Salvation in a Saddlebag 69
  • The Bacons 77
  • John Brown Comes to Hudson 89
  • The Coming of the Ellsworths 99
  • The War of 1812 106
  • A Fine New Church 116
  • Dianthe 122
  • Mary Anne 132
  • Western Reserve College 145
  • The First College Presidents 157
  • David Hudson Junior and the New Doctor 167
  • Hudson Dies, College Expands, Village Incorporates 188
  • A New Ellsworth Baby and Hudson’s Railroad Era 199
  • The Return 210
  • Epilogue 227
  • Notes to Text and Illustrations 254
  • Index 273
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