Called to Serve: The Bush School of Government and Public Service

By Charles F. Hermann; Sally Dee Wade | Go to book overview

Foreword

I first learned of the Bush School of Government and Public Service while watching a televised interview of former president George H. W. Bush in the early 2000s. Two things president Bush said in that interview about the Bush School stuck with me. The first was the phrase “our school,” which he used multiple times to refer to the college. The second was his reference to “public service as a noble calling,” which he eloquently described as the founding principle of “our school.” Roughly fifteen years later I found myself standing in front of the statue of President Bush in the courtyard as the newly appointed dean of the Bush School. I thought about those two phrases and realized how lucky I was to serve as a guardian of those ideas.

Still only twenty years old, our school is already a remarkable success story. This book tells the story of its formative years. It introduces the people and events that shaped its growth from a bold idea into an institution of higher learning that has taken its place among the very best in the world.

Chuck Hermann and Sally Dee Wade give us the insider view of the early discussions on possible locations for President Bush 41’s presidential library, including the brilliant idea of sweetening the Texas A&M proposal by adding a namesake college to the deal. They introduce us to the visionaries who crafted that proposal, sold it, and then made it reality.

They also introduce us to the brilliant men and women who shaped the direction of the college—politicians, community leaders, scholars, administrators, and staff—people who shared a dream of what the Bush School could become and were willing to put their own skin in the game to make it happen.

-vii-

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Called to Serve: The Bush School of Government and Public Service
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • 1 - The President Needs a Library 1
  • 2 - A New School on the Horizon 17
  • 3 - Trial and Error 32
  • 4 - Begin Again 52
  • 5 - A Change of Command 63
  • 6 - Gaining Momentum and Recognition 75
  • 7 - A Robust School in a New Decade 90
  • 8 - Continuing Education 115
  • 9 - What Are the Graduates Doing? 124
  • Postscript 171
  • Notes 179
  • Index 187
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