Called to Serve: The Bush School of Government and Public Service

By Charles F. Hermann; Sally Dee Wade | Go to book overview

4
Begin Again

Robert M. Gates as Acting Dean

In the summer of 1999, Texas A&M University moved to change the status of the Bush School as mandated by the terms of the new state budget. The approved line item authorizing $2.5 million for the school stipulated that it must first become an independent unit within the university with its own dean, who reports to the provost/executive vice president. In June the Texas A&M Faculty Senate passed a resolution outlining “the process of hiring a dean and his or her responsibilities of being in charge of a full-time staff, school governance policies, promotion procedures, tenure procedures and allocation of financial resources.”1 On July 23 the Texas A&M University System Board of Regents, chaired by Don Powell, authorized the change. The following week in Austin, the Texas Higher Education commissioner approved the requested reorganization.

Next, the university had to name an interim dean for the school while a search began for the first permanent dean. Friends of the former president suggested that the university might approach Robert M. Gates to serve briefly in the interim post. The university administration liked the idea and approached him with the offer.

After serving in the US Air Force, Robert Gates spent much of his career in the CIA. While there he earned a PhD in Russian and Soviet

-52-

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Called to Serve: The Bush School of Government and Public Service
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • 1 - The President Needs a Library 1
  • 2 - A New School on the Horizon 17
  • 3 - Trial and Error 32
  • 4 - Begin Again 52
  • 5 - A Change of Command 63
  • 6 - Gaining Momentum and Recognition 75
  • 7 - A Robust School in a New Decade 90
  • 8 - Continuing Education 115
  • 9 - What Are the Graduates Doing? 124
  • Postscript 171
  • Notes 179
  • Index 187
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