Dear Tiny Heart: The Letters of Jane Heap and Florence Reynolds

By Jane Heap; Florence Reynolds et al. | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Jane Purse and the late Florence Mack Treseder of Hollywood, California, deserve the credit for bringing to light the story of Jane Heap and Florence Reynolds. Over sixty years ago, Jane Purse read My Thirty Years War, an autobiography by Margaret Anderson, the flamboyant founder of an avant-garde literary journal, the Little Review (1914–1929). The Little Review was a revolutionary journal espousing feminism, anarchism, and the international avant-garde. Jane Purse was entranced by Anderson’s life in the radical artistic circles that ranged from Chicago to New York to Paris during the heyday of twentieth-century bohemia. From that moment on, Purse haunted bookstores looking for original copies of the Little Review, inevitably to be disappointed.

Years later, in the 1950s, she became friends with Florence Mack Treseder, the niece and namesake of Florence Reynolds. When Purse told Treseder of her passion for the Little Review and Margaret Anderson, Treseder told Purse that her aunt, Florence Reynolds, had been a great friend of Anderson’s coeditor, Jane Heap. Treseder had inherited from Reynolds boxes of letters, pictures, memorabilia, and even original Little Reviews. One day, while Purse was in the back room of her business, a local dog-grooming shop, Treseder stopped by and left several boxes of the Reynolds-Heap material. Purse was overwhelmed with excitement as she read the letters between the two women.

Purse believed the friendship of Florence Reynolds and Jane Heap was part of the untold story of the Little Review. The scrappy journal’s survival for over fifteen years as other “little magazines” fell by the wayside was far more understandable given Reynolds’s financial and emotional support. With the encouragement of Treseder, Purse undertook in the 1970s to write a book about the two women. She did extensive research concerning the Heap family, including trips to Heap’s

-xiii-

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Dear Tiny Heart: The Letters of Jane Heap and Florence Reynolds
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Cutting Edge ii
  • The Cutting Edge v
  • Title Page vii
  • Contents xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Note on the Text xvii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1908–1909 21
  • 1917–1918 43
  • 1922–1926 75
  • 1938–1945 127
  • Notes 175
  • Index 187
  • About the Editor 197
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