Dear Tiny Heart: The Letters of Jane Heap and Florence Reynolds

By Jane Heap; Florence Reynolds et al. | Go to book overview

Introduction

Jane Heap in appearance was as formidable as her literary reputa-
tion—a handsome heavy-set American with dark cropped hair,
that revealed the size and sculpture of a remarkable cranium. Her
warm brown eyes softened the austerity of her masculine counte-
nance, as well as the bright lipstick she wore on her generous
mouth. Her personal magnetism was almost visible.

—Katherine Hulme, Undiscovered Country

Jane Heap and Mina Loy were both talking brilliantly … Jane her
breezy, travelling-salesman-of the world tosh which was impossible
to recall later. But neither of these ladies needed to make sense. Con-
versation is an art with them, something entirely unrelated to sense
or reality or logic.

—Robert McAlmon, Being Geniuses Together

There is no one in the modern world whose conversation I haven’t
sampled, I believe, except Picasso’s. So I can’t say it isn’t better
than Jane Heap’s. But I doubt it in spite of his reputation.

—Margaret Anderson, My Thirty Years War

Jane was her name and Jane her station and Jane her nation and
Jane her situation. Thank you for thinking of how do you do how
do you like your two percent. Thank you for thinking how do you
do thank you Jane thank you too thank you for thinking thank you
for thank you. Thank you how do you. Thank you Jane thank you
how do you do.

—Gertrude Stein, “An Appreciation of Jane,”
Little Review, 1929

The letters of Jane Heap and Florence Reynolds, dating from 1908 to 1945, illuminate a brief love affair and lifelong friendship between two women whose bond demonstrates the nexus of sexuality, art, and spirituality for members of the international bohemia during the interwar period.

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Dear Tiny Heart: The Letters of Jane Heap and Florence Reynolds
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Cutting Edge ii
  • The Cutting Edge v
  • Title Page vii
  • Contents xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Note on the Text xvii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1908–1909 21
  • 1917–1918 43
  • 1922–1926 75
  • 1938–1945 127
  • Notes 175
  • Index 187
  • About the Editor 197
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