State of the Heart: South Carolina Writers on the Places They Love - Vol. 1

By Aïda Rogers | Go to book overview
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State of the Heart: South Carolina Writers on the Places They Love - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations xi
  • Foreword State of Surprise xiii
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Introduction- When the Peach Trees Bloom xix
  • The Beckoning 1
  • Near the Doorway 3
  • A Most Unexpected Muse 5
  • Counters, Barstools and Booths 11
  • For the Love of Dogs 13
  • "Please Tip the Oysterman" 16
  • Sipping from the Secret Cup 21
  • Chasing Tranquility 27
  • Weekend with Sadie 29
  • Big Woods 33
  • The Heart of the Garden 38
  • Close to the Clouds 43
  • Solace among the Sycamores 48
  • Reflection in the Water 51
  • From the Press Box 55
  • Where Dreams Rise and Fall 57
  • When Camelot Came to Columbia 62
  • Becoming and Overcoming 69
  • The Musty Smell of Books 71
  • The Beautiful Ugly 77
  • Transformation 82
  • The Beach House 88
  • The Ever-Present Past 97
  • The Fiery Serpent in the Wilderness 99
  • A Snapshot of My Mother at the Dock Street 112
  • Pilgrimage to Sullivan’s Island 117
  • A Place Called Hobcaw 121
  • Where God Is Courteous 128
  • Gone 133
  • Remembering Keowee 135
  • Blackberries for Bmws 142
  • The Groins 146
  • The Upper Broad River 154
  • No Forever for Old Farms 161
  • Birds, Fish, Water 167
  • For the Birds 169
  • Holy Ground 176
  • The Comforts of Home 183
  • My Quarter Acre of Paradise 185
  • A Little Different, a Little the Same 190
  • Home 195
  • Tobacco Roads 200
  • Mama’s House 204
  • Backyard Bliss 209
  • Evening Quiet 213
  • My Own Place 215
  • Contributors 219
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