The International Handbook of Suicide Prevention: Research, Policy and Practice

By Rory C. O’Connor; Jane Pirkis | Go to book overview

24
Lessons Learned from Clinical
Trials of the Collaborative
Assessment and Management
of Suicidality (CAMS)

David A. Jobes, Katherine Anne Comtois,
Lisa A. Brenner, Peter M. Gutierrez,
and Stephen S. O’Connor


CAMS Overview

Based on recognized clinical need and shaped by ongoing clinical research and applications across clinical settings, the “Collaborative Assessment and Management of Suicidality” (CAMS) is a flexible and adaptable clinical intervention for suicidal risk. CAMS addresses a range of clinical challenges that can make caring for suicidal patients so daunting (Jobes, Rudd, Overholser, & Joiner, 2008). The CAMS approach—which includes the use of a multipurpose clinical tool called the “Suicide Status Form” (SSF)— has been developed over 25 years and is supported by extensive clinical research (e.g., Arkov, Rosenbaum, Christiansen, Jonsson, & Munchow, 2008; Comtois et al., 2012; Ellis, Green, Allen, Jobes, & Nadorff, 2012; Ellis, Rufino, Allen, Fowler, & Jobes, 2015; Jobes, 1995, 2000, 2012; Jobes, Jacoby, Cimbolic, & Hustead, 1997; Jobes, Kahn-Greene, Greene, & Goeke-Morey, 2009; Jobes, Wong, Conrad, Drozd, & Neal-Walden, 2005; Nielsen, Alberdi, & Rosenbaum, 2011).

CAMS is best understood as a therapeutic framework that guides a suicide-specific intervention process. As such, CAMS is theoretically nondenominational, and can be employed by clinicians across mental health disciplines. CAMS-based SSF assessments are therapeutic; ongoing assessment, treatment planning, and tracking aspects of CAMS over interim sessions generate an extensive documentation trail, ensuring quality clinical care that should decrease potential liability. CAMS has primarily been used as an outpatient-oriented intervention, with an explicit goal of keeping suicidal patients out of the hospital. Nevertheless, research has also shown the value of inpatient CAMS use (Ellis et al., 2012, 2015). Although CAMS has been used to guide individual clinical work, other applications are being studied (Jobes, 2012)—for example, post-inpatient discharge CAMS-guided group therapy (Johnson, O’Connor,

The International Handbook of Suicide Prevention, Second Edition. Edited by Rory C. O’Connor and Jane Pirkis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Published 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

-431-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The International Handbook of Suicide Prevention: Research, Policy and Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 823

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.