The International Handbook of Suicide Prevention: Research, Policy and Practice

By Rory C. O’Connor; Jane Pirkis | Go to book overview

40
Suicide Research Methods
and Designs

Catherine R. Glenn, Joseph C. Franklin,
Jaclyn C. Kearns, Elizabeth C. Lanzillo,
and Matthew K. Nock


Introduction

This chapter reviews commonly used methods and designs for psychological studies of suicidal behavior (i.e., not biological, epidemiological, or treatment studies such as randomized controlled trials) and focuses primarily on two specific behavioral outcomes— suicide attempts: nonfatal self-injurious behavior performed with at least some intent to die, and suicide deaths: fatal self-injurious behavior performed with at least some intent to die (Silverman, Berman, Sanddal, O’Carroll, & Joiner, 2007). Although we focus on suicidal behaviors, most of the study designs can be used to examine other specific suicide outcomes, such as suicide ideation (i.e., thoughts of ending one’s life). We start with a brief discussion of important methodological issues to consider when conducting this type of research. Then, for each study design, we: (a) provide a brief description of the design and highlight some of the seminal studies, or reviews, using that approach; (b) discuss the design strengths, including the unique information provided, the kinds of research questions answered, and the knowledge of risk factors gained with that approach; and (c) review the limitations of the design, and specifically what information is not provided using that approach. To determine the knowledge of risk factors gained with each study design, we used the typology outlined by Kraemer and colleagues (1997; see Figure 2, p. 341), which details the conditions and evidence necessary to determine whether a factor is a correlate (factor associated with an outcome), risk factor (factor that precedes an outcome), fixed marker (risk factor that cannot be changed), variable risk factor (risk factor that can be changed), or causal risk factor (variable risk factor that can be manipulated to change an outcome). In addition to study designs, we review common types of instruments and informants used in these psychological studies, and conclude by highlighting some of the fundamental gaps in current knowledge of suicide risk factors and suggest the types of studies needed to advance research in each area.

The International Handbook of Suicide Prevention, Second Edition. Edited by Rory C. O’Connor and Jane Pirkis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Published 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

-710-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The International Handbook of Suicide Prevention: Research, Policy and Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 823

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.