The International Handbook of Suicide Prevention: Research, Policy and Practice

By Rory C. O’Connor; Jane Pirkis | Go to book overview

41
School-Based Suicide Prevention
Programs

Lynda Kong, Jitender Sareen, and
Laurence Y. Katz


Introduction

Suicide, defined as the act of deliberately killing oneself, is an international public health problem affecting young people. For the past five decades, suicide has been the third leading cause of death worldwide in young people aged 15–19 years, with a mean rate of 7.4 per 100,000 (Wasserman, Cheng, & Jiang, 2005). In the United States, suicide accounts for more deaths in people aged 24 and younger than all natural causes combined, and disturbingly, suicide occurs in children as young as 10 years old (Gould & Kramer, 2001). In addition, the 2013 American Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System found that 17% of youths in grades 9–12 (14–17 years old) had seriously considered attempting suicide in the past 12 months, with 14% of that 17% having made a plan to attempt suicide in the past 12 months. In the same time period 8% of students attempted suicide one or more times, and 3% of the 8% who had attempted required treatment by a doctor or a nurse as a result of the suicide attempt (Kann et al., 2014). Unfortunately, the rates of suicide and suicide attempts in young people have tripled in the past 50 years in the United States, and are continuing to rise (Cash & Bridge, 2009; Gould & Kramer, 2001; Kann et al., 2014). Compounding the high prevalence of suicide, young people also do not seek help when experiencing suicidal ideation, and the rate of help seeking dives even lower when suicidal ideation is coupled with mental illness (Pagura, Fotti, Katz, Sareen, & The Swampy Cree Suicide Prevention Team, 2009; Strunk, Sorter, Ossege, & King, 2014). A variety of factors likely contribute to the resistance to help seeking, including stigmatization of mental illness, normalization of suicide as a coping mechanism, and lack of familiarity with available resources.

There is a great sense of urgency to reduce the rate of suicide in young people, and this has become a public health focus in recent decades. A part of this focus is that of educational programs in schools. Intuitively, it is clear that the school environment

The International Handbook of Suicide Prevention, Second Edition. Edited by Rory C. O’Connor and Jane Pirkis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Published 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

-725-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The International Handbook of Suicide Prevention: Research, Policy and Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 823

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.