The International Handbook of Suicide Prevention: Research, Policy and Practice

By Rory C. O’Connor; Jane Pirkis | Go to book overview

44
Making an Economic Case
for Investing in Suicide Prevention
Quo Vadis?

David McDaid


Introduction

The nineteenth century German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer, writing about suicide, sought to rationalize it as an event occurring “as soon as the terrors of life reach the point at which they outweigh the terrors of death” (Schopenhauer, 1851). Some twentieth century economists have also sought to rationalize suicide in a similar fashion (Hamermesh & Soss, 1974; Marcotte, 2003; McDaid & Kennelly, 2009). Arguably though, only those who have experienced the loss of a loved one through suicide can begin to understand the enormity of such an event. To those who have lived through this experience, or indeed have contemplated ending their own lives or attempted to do so, the costs can be incalculable. The notion that an economic cost can be attached to suicide may strike them not only as being futile but potentially offensive. How and why should a monetary value be placed on the loss of life? Surely, they may contend, it is immoral to consider such a personal tragedy from an economic perspective?

This chapter will however argue that in fact it is immoral not to consider the economic impact of suicide, and that these arguments can be very powerful in helping to influence the development of suicide prevention strategies around the globe. It begins by briefly outlining the basic principles for estimating the costs of suicides and the role of economic evaluation. It then goes on to provide a snapshot of what is known about the costs of suicidal behavior and the cost-effectiveness of suicide prevention strategies and ends by considering how the economic evidence base might be strengthened further. Unless otherwise stated, all monetary values throughout the chapter are reported using International Monetary Fund purchasing power parity (PPP)-adjusted 2014 U.S. dollars.

The International Handbook of Suicide Prevention, Second Edition. Edited by Rory C. O’Connor and Jane Pirkis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Published 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

-775-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The International Handbook of Suicide Prevention: Research, Policy and Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 823

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.