Child Welfare Systems and Migrant Children: A Cross Country Study of Policies and Practice

By Marit Skivenes; Ravinder Barn et al. | Go to book overview

10
CHILD WELFARE AND MIGRANT
FAMILIES AND CHILDREN:
A CASE STUDY OF ENGLAND

Ravinder Barn and Derek Kirton


INTRODUCTION

This chapter explores child welfare policy, practice, and provision in relation to migrant families and children in England. It is perhaps useful to offer a comment on our use of the term “migrant” here, not least as in an English context, “immigrant” is an overwhelmingly ethnicized, often racialized, and almost always highly politicized term. Many who migrated in the latter part of the twentieth century have established large and readily identifiable minority ethnic communities, while there is also a significant and growing number of “small communities” (Modood, 2007). It is also important to acknowledge the wide range of legal status, from citizenship and those with rights of refuge, settlement, or residence through to those who have an “irregular” status arising from refused asylum, overstaying, or illegal entry. The amalgam of temporal and legal variation creates an extremely diverse group of migrants, and we have chosen to consider the situations both of established minority ethnic groups and more recent migrants for two main reasons. The first is that there is considerable shared experience, as well as differences. A second and more pragmatic reason is that official and research data do not typically distinguish according to length of settlement or countries of origin. Where separate data are available or policy measures clearly apply to particular groups of migrants, this is made clear. Depending on the circumstances of arrival, settlement and subsequent

-199-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Child Welfare Systems and Migrant Children: A Cross Country Study of Policies and Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 292

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.