Child Welfare Systems and Migrant Children: A Cross Country Study of Policies and Practice

By Marit Skivenes; Ravinder Barn et al. | Go to book overview

11
CHILD PROTECTION OF MIGRANTS
IN AUSTRALIA

Ilan Katz


INTRODUCTION

Since its settlement, Australia has been a country that has attracted large numbers of migrants. As of June 30, 2011, 27% of the estimated resident population was born overseas, and half had at least one parent born overseas (ABS, 2012). The largest group of migrants was from the United Kingdom (UK) followed by New Zealand, China, India, and Vietnam. Australia has also become ethnically diverse, with migrants coming from virtually every country in the world. Although migrants make up a large proportion of the population, Australia has a history of suspicion and hostility toward migrant populations, especially those from non-English-speaking backgrounds. Migration, and especially the treatment of refugees and asylum seekers, has always been a difficult and contested area of policy in Australia.

The history of the child protection system (CPS) in Australia has also been complex and challenging and has been intertwined with the colonial history of the country itself. This is perhaps best illustrated by the fact that in recent years the Australian government has apologized to various groups of people who have been harmed by the CPS, including Indigenous Australian children forcibly removed from their families, “Forgotten Australians” who were brought to Australia from the UK as children, often under false pretences, the victims of forced adoptions, which were prevalent until the 1970s, and victims of abuse in institutions, particularly those run by churches. This history has had a profound effect on the CPS.

-220-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Child Welfare Systems and Migrant Children: A Cross Country Study of Policies and Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 292

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.