Refugees in International Relations

By Alexander Betts; Gil Loescher | Go to book overview

11
UNHCR and the Securitization of
Forced Migration

Anne Hammerstad


ABSTRACT

Since the end of the Cold War, and particularly after the terror attacks of
11 September 2001 in the United States, refugee movements have increasingly
been portrayed by state policy makers, the media, and even the UN High
Commissioner for Refugees as a threat to security. This development is intrin-
sically linked to the widening of the concept of security in the post-Cold War
period beyond the traditional Realist notion of national security as the mili-
tary protection of state sovereignty and territorial integrity. This trend can be
seen in the academic literature as well as in the discourses of states, regional
organizations, and the UN. It is a phenomenon that can be observed in the
industrialized North as well as in the developing South, albeit in different
manifestations.

The securitization of forced migrants, whether they be mass influxes of refu-
gees in the global South or asylum seekers in the North, has had a significant
impact not only on how we talk about displacement, but also on what solutions
we deem appropriate for dealing with their situation. Using the securitization
approach of the Copenhagen School, this chapter will trace the process of secu-
ritization of forced migration over the past two decades. It will then discuss the
consequences of this securitization for the treatment of asylum seekers in the
North and mass refugee flows in the South. The links between, on the one hand,
Northern attitudes and actions to deter and return asylum seekers, and on the
other hand, an increased unwillingness to receive refugees in the South will also
be explored.

We must attempt to reduce complex political questions in the minds of nations into simple moral and humanitarian components for the heart to answer. (Sadruddin Aga Khan, UN High Commissioner for Refugees, November 1974)

Population displacement, whether internal or international has gone beyond the humanitarian domain to become a major political, security and socio-economic

-237-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Refugees in International Relations
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 337

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.