Environmental Science and International Politics: Acid Rain in Europe, 1979-1989, and Climate Change in Copenhagen 2009

By David E. Henderson; Susan K. Henderson | Go to book overview

1
Historical
Background

OVERVIEW

This is a reacting game. Reacting games use complex role-play to teach about important moments in history. This game is set in a series of conferences sponsored by the United Nations (UN) that began in Geneva, Switzerland, in 1979 and continued for over a decade. The goal is to negotiate a treaty governing air pollutants transported across international borders within Europe. The game includes negotiations that followed in Helsinki, Finland, in 1984 and in Sophia, Bulgaria, in 1987. The result of these negotiations was the Long Range Transport Air Pollution Treaty, which continues in Europe to the present day.

The events that unfold in this game occur against the backdrop of larger negotiations within Europe on forming a European Economic Community (the EEC). The full details of these changes will become apparent as the game proceeds. But the fact that nations are being asked to give up some control over their energy and transportation sectors to support the general welfare of the region marks a turning point in the national sovereignty of these nations. At the time the negotiations begin, the idea of the European Union (EU) is just that, an idea in progress. National borders are still patrolled with checkpoints, and each nation has its own currency. In fact, air pollution is about the only thing that moves freely between the nations and across the Iron Curtain. The issue of transnational pollution was possibly the first area where national sovereignty was sacrificed for the common European good.


VIGNETTE: AN EVENING IN GENEVA

It has been a long day. This morning you met with the prime minister to go over your final instructions for the conference in Geneva and to plan strategy. After a quick lunch you hopped on a two-hour flight to Geneva and eventually got into your hotel room. You had dinner in your room while you read through the briefing papers one more time. Now your last task for the day is the opening reception for the conference that begins

-14-

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Environmental Science and International Politics: Acid Rain in Europe, 1979-1989, and Climate Change in Copenhagen 2009
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Note to Instructors viii
  • How to Play These Games 1
  • Contents 8
  • Figures and Tables 11
  • 1 - Historical Background 14
  • 2 - The Game 35
  • 3 - Roles and Factions 41
  • 4 - Core Texts and Supplemental Readings 44
  • Bibliography 106
  • Acknowledgments 109
  • Appendix 1- Introduction to Environmental Philosophy 110
  • Appendix 2- Introduction to Environmental Economics 116
  • Appendix 3- Using Numbers to Make Arguments 119
  • Appendix 4- Study Questions for Reading Assignments 121
  • Contents 124
  • Figures and Tables 127
  • 1 - Historical Background 129
  • 2 - The Game 153
  • 3 - Roles and Factions 159
  • 4 - Core Texts and Supplemental Readings 162
  • Acknowledgments 164
  • Appendix 1- Green House Gases 165
  • Appendix 2- Chemicals in Fossil Fuels 168
  • Appendix 3- Quantitative Look at Combustion Reactions 172
  • Appendix 4- Leaked Draft Document by Danish Delegates 180
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