The Dynamics of Radicalization: A Relational and Comparative Perspective

By Eitan Y. Alimi; Chares Demetriou et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6
Processes of Radicalization:
Dissimilarities in Similarities
The explanatory comparative framework developed in this volume suggests that processes of radicalization are characterized and driven most centrally, albeit not exclusively, by a given set of relational mechanisms emerging from a given set of arenas of interaction, and that this holds in varied settings. The preceding three chapters demonstrated in detail how this happened in episodes of radicalization distinguished from each other by marked differences in initial conditions. In spite of these differences relational mechanisms operated in a robust and consequential manner across the processes of radicalization undergone by the Brigate Rosse (BR), the National Organization of Cypriot Fighters (EOKA), and al-Qaeda (AQ). At this stage, our treatment of radicalization in comparative perspective takes a complementary, albeit different direction: if up until now we have established similarities in dissimilarities, the following discussion moves to flesh out aspects of dissimilarities in the development and progression of radicalization.By now, readers should be familiar with one important aspect of dissimilarities: the particular, episode-specific sets of underlying mechanisms constituting each mechanism. But there are more aspects of dissimilarities, the sources of which are found not only in the unique initial conditions of each episode but also in the relational, conjunctural, and contingent nature of processes of radicalization. In what follows, we refer to our three primary episodes and to additional episodes in order to discuss how these sources of dissimilarity play out in:
Forming the episode-specific composition of sub-mechanisms constituting the mechanisms, which we call particularities of radicalization;

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