The American Soul Rush: Esalen and the Rise of Spiritual Privilege

By Marion Goldman | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

It is impossible to fully acknowledge everyone who helped me learn and write about spiritual privilege. Individuals associated with Esalen contributed to my understanding throughout this project, and my colleagues and friends sustained me in every way.

Research funding from the Donald C. Davidson Library at the University of California at Santa Barbara and from the Summer Research Program at the University of Oregon made it possible for me to spend time in Big Sur, Palo Alto, San Francisco, and Santa Barbara. When I could not be there, Donna Lowe provided essential research assistance in California.

In the University of Oregon Department of Sociology, Jennifer MaarefiMemar transcribed tapes and Shelley Carlson continually offered good ideas and unflagging encouragement. From start to finish, Christopher Blum solved the mysteries of Macs and made me smile.

Linda Long’s knowledge about manuscript collections on alternative religions made a world of difference to this project. Gordon Melton helped me discover key themes and guided me to critical sources in the American Religion and Humanistic Psychology Collections in Special Collections at the Davidson Library at UCSB. David Gartrell, Manuscripts Curator for the Humanistic Psychology Archives and the American Religion Collection at UCSB, went out of his way to find hidden treasures that I would have missed otherwise.

Nicole Sheikh portrayed the California Institute of Integral Studies through a few extraordinary images. And Lori Lewis’s pictures of Esalen reflect her deep connection to the Institute, as well as her talent and insight.

Amy Jo Woodruff was not only a copy editor but also a source of good cheer and great ideas. Jennifer Hammer, my editor at NYU Press, was right about almost everything! She understood the idea of spiritual privilege long before I fully articulated it, and she called my attention to the differences between things like a wooly llama and a wise lama.

Despina Papazoglou Gimbel shepherded the manuscript through publication with understanding and generosity. Thanks also to the graduate stu

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