The American Soul Rush: Esalen and the Rise of Spiritual Privilege

By Marion Goldman | Go to book overview

6
Esalen’s Legacies

When Michael and Dick founded Esalen early in the 1960s, they sought guidance and support from spiritually privileged elites and intellectuals. Michael soon reached far beyond his friends and acquaintances in California, however, to create relationships with other privileged seekers on the West and East Coasts.

Michael’s genial personality, cultural and spiritual knowledge, and economic resources attracted moneyed supporters, public intellectuals, and politicians to Big Sur, where they met and became casual friends with Esalen insiders and with one another in the 1960s and early 1970s. The Institute was a gathering place and site for exchanges that led to a few close alliances and also generated many loose social networks that would later benefit their members (McAdam, McCarthy, and Zald 1996).

Esalen was never an independent social movement. Instead, it was a magnet for strategic actors from various grass-roots and professional groups that focused on expanding different aspects of human potential. Key members of diverse organizations that were engaged in transforming American psychology and spirituality sometimes met for the first time in Big Sur. They discovered common values and new possibilities for action when they participated in seminars and workshops or talked informally over meals and in the hot springs.

After they departed, the visitors often formed temporary coalitions to advance their shared goals. Relatively brief alliances and mutual support contributed to both Esalen’s enduring social impact and to the independent accomplishments of different movements for social change in the 1960s and early 1970s (Burt 2005).

The human potential activists rarely became lifetime friends with the founding circle or with other notable individuals who passed through Big Sur. However, acquaintances, not close friends, are the people that are most likely to help others enter different social networks, start new careers, or get projects off the ground (Granovetter 1973). During the Institute’s first

-139-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The American Soul Rush: Esalen and the Rise of Spiritual Privilege
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 207

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.