Print News and Raise Hell: The Daily Tar Heel and the Evolution of a Modern University

By Kenneth Joel Zogry | Go to book overview

4
PRINT NEWS
AND RAISE HELL
1959–1971

A NEW FRONTIER AND THE END
OF THE DIXIE CLASSIC

As the Daily Tar Heel approached its seventyfifth anniversary, it had become a sophisticated newspaper with makeup and layout on the order of the best big-city dailies of the era and an informed and generally progressive editorial page read across the state and beyond. Generations of editors and staff had worked to build such a paper, first in the 1920s and 1930s, and then again after the disruption of World War II. The student caretakers of the 1960s understood the established legacy of professional journalistic standards and freedom of speech that formed the core of the Daily Tar Heel, and they carefully protected those attributes through a decade that would witness some of the most tumultuous social, political, and cultural change in American history and on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

One of the hallmarks of the paper in the mid-twentieth century was its broader worldview, presented both in national and international news coverage and in editorials. Wireservice stories, nationally syndicated columns, and political cartoons like those of the Washington Post’s Herblock were regular features. As the 1960 presidential campaign began to take shape in the fall of 1959, the DTH covered it in far more detail than had been done in previous election cycles. In-depth articles and editorials ran about the potential candidates, and after the nominating conventions a daily front-page feature entitled “What They’re Saying” appeared that included pictures of Democrat John F. Kennedy and Republican Richard Nixon alongside the latest campaign news. The paper had often been critical of Richard Nixon during his two terms as

-164-

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Print News and Raise Hell: The Daily Tar Heel and the Evolution of a Modern University
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1- Official Organ of the Athletic Association 1893–1923 6
  • 2- Crack-Brained Professors and Baby Radicals 1923–1941 54
  • 3- The Truth in Eight-Point Type 1941–1959 105
  • 4- Print News and Raise Hell 1959–1971 164
  • 5- A Free Press Must Prevail 1971–1993 232
  • Epilogue- Serving Unc Students and the University Community since 1893 291
  • Acknowledgments 307
  • Photo Credits 311
  • Notes 313
  • Index 335
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