Print News and Raise Hell: The Daily Tar Heel and the Evolution of a Modern University

By Kenneth Joel Zogry | Go to book overview

EPILOGUE
SERVING UNC
STUDENTS AND
THE UNIVERSITY
COMMUNITY SINCE
1893

At the time the Daily Tar Heel became independent of student-fee funding in 1993, no one could have anticipated the challenges that lay ahead in the new millennium. The quarter century between the paper’s 100th anniversary and its 125th witnessed the coming of the digital information age, and virtually all aspects of traditional print journalism were upended, almost to the point of extinction. Simply put, the way news is gathered and delivered, and the way people access and interact with it, has been revolutionized.

What resulted during the difficult transition was professional carnage, as many venerable newspapers folded and others shrank drastically in staff and print size. News, editorials, and perhaps most importantly reader response and opinion became literally instantaneous, available 24/7 on a variety of highly portable wireless devices that erased the lead time necessary to print and distribute hard copy. Though print media had faced downsizing and even obsolescence before—first with radio in the early 1920s, followed by television after World War II—it had been able to retool and find a place alongside the new technologies. But the obstacles of the digital information revolution were far more daunting.

In general, college newspapers, with very targeted and captive audiences, were able to initially weather the storm. This was particularly true for the Daily Tar Heel, which serves Orange County as well as the university. As late as 2011, the new nonprofit independent business model of DTH Media boasted cash reserves of some $1 million. But the recession of 2008–2009 drove down advertising revenue as businesses tightened their belts or closed altogether, at the same time that social media became a virtual platform

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Print News and Raise Hell: The Daily Tar Heel and the Evolution of a Modern University
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1- Official Organ of the Athletic Association 1893–1923 6
  • 2- Crack-Brained Professors and Baby Radicals 1923–1941 54
  • 3- The Truth in Eight-Point Type 1941–1959 105
  • 4- Print News and Raise Hell 1959–1971 164
  • 5- A Free Press Must Prevail 1971–1993 232
  • Epilogue- Serving Unc Students and the University Community since 1893 291
  • Acknowledgments 307
  • Photo Credits 311
  • Notes 313
  • Index 335
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