Print News and Raise Hell: The Daily Tar Heel and the Evolution of a Modern University

By Kenneth Joel Zogry | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This book was a very complicated project on many levels, and I am indebted to several dozen people who assisted its progress along the way. The project began in April 2011, when the book was commissioned by DTH Media. The manuscript was completed in October 2013, but did not arrive at UNC Press for another three years. In a somewhat bizarre plot twist, the book became entangled in the financial and administrative struggles at DTH Media, written about briefly in the epilogue. I am deeply grateful to all of those who worked to see this published, and who helped to keep me calm during an extremely difficult and trying process.

The book is dedicated to Bill Friday, who was critically important in the very earliest stages of this project in terms of shaping its overall themes and direction. I was privileged to know him during the last fourteen years of his life, and we worked together on several projects along the way. It was an honor to know a man of his character and historical significance to the University of North Carolina and to the state.

After Bill, the most important person to thank is Ed Yoder. His assistance was invaluable in writing portions of chapters 3 and 4, but equally important, he became an advocate of the project early on, and remained a source of steadfast support over some six years. He pushed and prodded anyone who might move the book along—at times when no one else would—and served splendidly as a cheerful and sharp-eyed critic of the manuscript. There were times I was in despair over this book, but Ed was always there to bolster my spirits and rally the troops.

UNC Press, particularly in the persons of David Perry and Mark Simpson-Vos, made this book a reality. David believed in the project early on, and was a source of great support and a wonderful sounding board in the early stages. Mark took over when David retired, and went far beyond the call of duty in terms of sticking with the project as we wound our way through several years of legal issues. It would have been much easier, and understandable, if Mark had walked away. But he did not, and for that I am eternally grateful. Mark’s persistence and guidance not only resulted in publication under the UNC Press imprint but also produced a far superior book. My thanks also to those at UNC Press who were part of this project, particularly Mark’s able assistant, Jessica Newman, who cheerfully guided me along in the final stages (no small task).

As noted, DTH Media originally commissioned the book. I am grateful to Erica Perel, the only staff member there through the entire course of this project, for her assistance and support along the way. Betsy O’Donovan, who took over as executive director in mid-2016, understood the value of the manuscript to the future of the Daily Tar Heel, as well as to its past, and worked with me to see the book in print. It is my hope that the book will both help future students who work on the Daily Tar Heel to understand its rich history and context, and assist DTH Media in reinventing and strengthening its business model to assure that the paper is around for another 125 years.

Several longtime colleagues and friends played important roles in the creation of this

-307-

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Print News and Raise Hell: The Daily Tar Heel and the Evolution of a Modern University
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1- Official Organ of the Athletic Association 1893–1923 6
  • 2- Crack-Brained Professors and Baby Radicals 1923–1941 54
  • 3- The Truth in Eight-Point Type 1941–1959 105
  • 4- Print News and Raise Hell 1959–1971 164
  • 5- A Free Press Must Prevail 1971–1993 232
  • Epilogue- Serving Unc Students and the University Community since 1893 291
  • Acknowledgments 307
  • Photo Credits 311
  • Notes 313
  • Index 335
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