Globalizing Music Education: A Framework

By Alexandra Kertz-Welzel | Go to book overview

Introduction

GLOBALIZATION AND INTERNATIONALIZATION have shaped our lives in ways that we do not notice anymore: the same food or fashion chains in cities worldwide, the same songs wherever we go, similar architecture in different parts of the world. Even though there usually is a touch of local flavor in everything we encounter, the international commonalities are striking. But we also know other facets of globalization and internationalization: the global reality of violence and terror by fanatic international networks, related to ideologies or religious beliefs, threatening our world order and democratic principles; the exploitation of people and resources; or the fear and rejection of globalization and internationalization, because people feel threatened by immigrants and the global economy. These and many more aspects indicate that globalization and internationalization are multifaceted and challenging, shaping lives worldwide. No matter what we think about these developments, we should face that we live in a global world, where everything and everybody is interconnected.

There are certainly various ways of encountering globalization and internationalization, publicly and individually. In the public sphere, regarding global politics or economy, international organizations such as the United Nations (UN), the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), or the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) stand for a global world order. Likewise, there are representatives of internationalization in specialized fields, such as International Music Council (IMC) or International Society for Music Education (ISME). But globalization and internationalization are also present in personal histories. People studying, working, or living abroad encounter the challenges and opportunities of globalization and internationalization, which shape their professional and private identities.

These personal experiences have been the starting point for this book. I spent three and a half years, from 2002 until 2005, as a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington. As someone who had never encountered music education in any other than the German context, I faced personal and professional struggles. Realizing that I was not the only one facing these problems eventually led to the decision to turn these challenges affecting my professional identity into a research project, investigating them from a scholarly and interdisciplinary perspective. This book is the result of this personal and

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Globalizing Music Education: A Framework
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Globalization and Internationalization 17
  • 2 - Thinking Globally in Music Education Research 35
  • 3 - Developing a Global Mindset 80
  • Conclusion 111
  • Bibliography 117
  • Index 129
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