Globalizing Music Education: A Framework

By Alexandra Kertz-Welzel | Go to book overview

1
Globalization and Internationalization

WHEN, IN 1968, the first picture of the world from outer space was released, taken by the crew of Apollo 8 on Christmas Eve,1 the notion of what the world is changed. The picture, known as Earthrise, showed the earth as a unity, rising in the dark as seen from a lunar landscape, showing the beauty but also the loneliness and vulnerability of a blue planet. It made it completely clear that the world was one, a unity sharing the same fate.

This picture, which has become an icon of our age, is certainly a symbol for globalization—a word that signifies like no other term the fears and hopes of people living in the twenty-first century. For many people, globalization stands for a specific world order, a certain economic model, new technologies, or a unified world culture. It seems to promise welfare, mobility, and interconnectedness. But at the same time, it appears to provoke conflicts, inequality, or national seclusion. Internationalization, on the contrary, is mostly understood as a positive term, describing global connectedness and the opportunities it offers. It might even evoke the vision of a unified and peaceful worldwide community. Both globalization and internationalization have a deep impact on politics, economy, and culture but also on individual identities. They put our private and professional lives in a global perspective, uncovering their vulnerability to economic crisis, political uprisings, or natural disasters. Ultimately, they prove that there is no way out, because as Earthrise shows, the world is one, and everybody is a part of it.

This book addresses these issues with regard to music education. In this chapter, the focus is on general issues of the conceptual framework. Education, music, and language are presented as conceptual elements, offering a specific perspective on the impact that globalization and internationalization have on music education. These three conceptual elements provide the foundation for understanding, evaluating, and shaping a united but diverse global music education community.


Education

The connection between globalization, internationalization, and education is multifaceted. It can concern different ways of learning in terms of formal and informal and new concepts such as global citizenship or international education but also higher education, long-distance education, or music education policy.

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Globalizing Music Education: A Framework
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Globalization and Internationalization 17
  • 2 - Thinking Globally in Music Education Research 35
  • 3 - Developing a Global Mindset 80
  • Conclusion 111
  • Bibliography 117
  • Index 129
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