Globalizing Music Education: A Framework

By Alexandra Kertz-Welzel | Go to book overview

2
Thinking Globally in Music
Education Research

GLOBALIZATION CHALLENGES OUR common ways of thinking and acting in music education. We need to learn to think globally regarding various areas of music education, particularly in research and higher education. We need to globalize music education. This concerns, for instance, realizing that global exchange processes in terms of educational transfer are important. Identifying educational transfer in music education internationally, but also using and shaping it for improving music education worldwide, can play a significant role in globalizing music education. Additionally, this means defining music education research as a global field, thereby establishing comparative and international research as foundations of our profession. This concerns likewise reconsidering what being a global music education community means, what the challenges and opportunities are, and how we can nurture culturally sensitive globalizing of music education. This certainly includes critically investigating how the global knowledge production in music education works and how we can shape it in a way to embrace diversity. Having these four issues as conceptual elements of a framework establishes thinking globally in music education research as an important category for globalizing music education.


Educational Transfer

Music education internationally is characterized by two completely different tendencies. On the one hand, there are distinctly different music education concepts based on national traditions. On the other hand, there seems to be a convergence in music education worldwide. Approaches such as Orff or the American band model are popular in many countries. National standards also play a significant role in music education around the globe. Music education in times of globalization seems to be a complex endeavor.

If international music education today is multifaceted, what could be a joint point of reference? What could function as a link? Jeremy Rappleye states that “transfer is the ‘uniting idea’ of the field and the bedrock of what defines our international endeavor.”1 Educational transfer in terms of borrowing approaches or policies from foreign countries is an important concept in comparative education, exemplifying transnational connections and the flow of ideas. It can help understanding music education and research as global fields. Educational

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Globalizing Music Education: A Framework
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Globalization and Internationalization 17
  • 2 - Thinking Globally in Music Education Research 35
  • 3 - Developing a Global Mindset 80
  • Conclusion 111
  • Bibliography 117
  • Index 129
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